Moving to WP-Engine

Reasons to move hollywood-elsewhere.com to WP-Engine

The graphic above presents a point-by-point overview of why having hollywood-elsewhere.com on WP-Engine’s WordPress cloud is a better solution than continuing on your LiquidWeb dedicated server.
Some further thoughts on specific points above.

SUPPORT
While LiquidWeb Linux SERVER support has been mostly timely and effective in my direct experience working with your site, you’ve certainly expressed frustration with their performance in the past. So far, I’ve had zero issues with WP-Engine. My access with support either by phone or chat has been almost immediate, and their experts have been knowledgeable about BOTH WordPress and the WP-Engine cloud platform.
And an important distinction between your present situation and WP-Engine is that there is NO-ONE at Liquidweb you can access who is a WordPress expert. You should have that level of support with your hosting.

TIME TO RESTORE SITE
LiquidWeb’s managed WordPress failed in both backups and restores because at 30GB in size, your WordPress site was too big for their system. And the one reason your site was too big for their system was your “images” folder, which is 27.5GB in size and contains over 40K files. WP-Engine has a proprietary and seamless technology that lets us store that huge folder on Amazon storage for a very cheap cost.
(estimated at no more than about 30-40 dollars a year!)
With all that data over on Amazon servers, WP-Engine now only has to backup (or restore) a 2.5GB site.
When I tested backups, they took only about 10 minutes. When I tested a restore, it took only about 15 minutes,
AND A CACHED VERSION OF YOUR SITE REMAINED UP THE WHOLE TIME!
(When we tried a restore on LiquidWeb’s managed cloud, your site was down for 2 days!)

RISK OF COMPLETE SITE LOSS
It is VERY unlikely that you could lose all of your site on LiquidWeb.
But it is possible.
All of your site code and all of your backups are on ONE server in LiquidWeb’s Chicago datacenter. Something happens to that server (again, VERY unlikely) and almost 350,000 posts & 800,000 comments going back to 2004 are simply GONE!
Having your site on a cloud installation means the data is mirrored over multiple servers and a single point of failure can’t happen.

COST
As you see above, we know the precise cost of staying with LiquidWeb: almost 5000 dollars a year.
I’m estimating your costs on WP-Engine as 1800 dollars a year and want to explain why that’s just an estimate, and how the costs break down.

If you purchase annually instead of monthly, you get 2 months for free.
So 1 year of WP-Engine at the professional tier would be $990.00

That professional tier on WP-Engine provides a certain number of visits per month without overage charges (where 1 visit = a specific IP address — or computer user — visiting the site over 24 hours). Looking at the visitors of your site over the past 6 months, your visits numbers have been always over that number: sometimes just slightly, sometimes significantly.
Based on the last 6 months of traffic, I’m estimating $780.00 in overage fees for the next year.

And my estimate for your Amazon storage fees — explained above — is $30.00.

Recommended path forward if you decide to move to WP-Engine

STEP ONE — RETURN DNS SERVERS TO WEB.COM
While your domain is registered with web.com, at present your DNS servers are LiquidWeb DNS servers and need to be changed back to web.com DNS servers.
(DNS servers are like a “phonebook” telling the internet how to get to your site.)
To lessen any chance of site disruption, I would make this change on a weekend evening.

STEP TWO — CHANGE DNS RECORDS TO POINT HOLLYWOOD-ELSEWHERE.COM TO WP-ENGINE
On an agreed-upon day, after you’ve completed posting for the day,
you would log out of WordPress on all your computers.
The next morning I would copy your most recent posts (and drafts) from LiquidWeb onto WP-Engine.
I would then change the DNS records to point away from your LiquidWeb server and towards WP-Engine. There should be no site downtime during this change, and it should take about an hour or so for these changes to propagate around the globe.
I would make this change around 6am EST, so that when you’re ready to start composing and posting on that day, you’d just log back into WordPress and now you’d be connected to WP-Engine instead of your old server

STEP THREE — MONITOR SITE BEHAVIOR ON WP-ENGINE
To assure there are no issues, we would track site activity on WP-Engine for about a week while still keeping your LiquidWeb dedicated server running. If there were any problems, we’d copy posts back to LiquidWeb and change DNS to point your site back to LiquidWeb.

STEP FOUR — CANCEL LIQUIDWEB ACCOUNT
Assuming no issues, you’d cancel your LiquidWeb account prior to the next monthly renewal on 10/12/17.